How Much Should I Water My Plants?

There are many factors that can affect how much you should be watering your plants. For instance, the size of your plant, where it is placed, how much sunlight it gets, the time of year, if it’s near a radiator. Some plants are just naturally more thirsty than others and some need next to no water at all.

 

However, don’t let this put you off – you can perform a very simple test.

How to test if your plant needs water

The simplest trick is to stick a finger into the topsoil and if it feels moist up to the second knuckle of your finger (roughly one inch) then it does not require watering. Additionally, by ensuring there are holes in your nursery pot or a stone/gravel layer between your main pot bottom and soil. This will allow the water within your soil to drain through and prevent the soil becoming saturated which leads to an anaerobic environment developing.

However, we have soil & light combitesters, which you insert into the soil and you can detect how moist the soil already is.

How much water is too much?

One of the most common reasons people end up killing their plants is through over-watering. It can be really tempting to keep topping your plant up with water but roots need oxygen to breathe just as we do. Over-watering them means they can no longer breathe which causes an anaerobic process leading to root-rot and means the plant can no longer absorb the nutrients needed in order to grow.

 

Excess watering can also lead to the growth of moulds, fungus & powdery mildew in or on the soil.

What to do in an emergency situation

If you’re pretty sure you’ve drowned the life out of your plant you may be able to save it. The first less invasive measure is to stick a tampon into the soil to help absorb any excess water. However, if you require more drastic action, you can take the entire plant out of its soil and re-pot it into fresh dry soil (not completely dry) and check the roots for any signs of rotting.

Consider these products for watering your indoor houseplants